Ronan Glynn steps down as Deputy Chief Medical Officer

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Dr Ronan Glynn, one of the health officials who led Ireland through Covid-19, has resigned.

He is the latest health official to step down as Ireland emerges from the coronavirus pandemic.

Dr. Glynn will take up a position with the professional services firm EY.

He is following in the footsteps of Chief Medical Officer Dr Tony Holohan, who has already confirmed he will be leaving his post at the Department of Health.

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Dr Ronan Glynn (left) with Health Minister Stephen Donnelly in September 2020 (Brian Lawless/PA)

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Dr Ronan Glynn (left) with Health Minister Stephen Donnelly in September 2020 (Brian Lawless/PA)

A department spokesperson said: “Dr. Ronan Glynn has resigned as Deputy Chief Medical Officer, effective May 31, 2022.”

“I can confirm that Ronan Glynn will join EY later this year,” said an EY spokesperson.

In a statement, Taoiseach Micheal Martin paid tribute to Dr Glynn’s “tireless, dedicated and tireless work” in the fight against Covid-19, which he said was “so important to the health and well-being of the nation”.

“Ronan’s calm demeanor and knowledge of public health have been instrumental in our national effort throughout the pandemic.

“Ronan embodies the best of Irish public service, and I wish him well in the future.”

Tanaiste Leo Varadkar thanked Dr Glynn and Dr Holohan for their contributions to Ireland’s public health response and wished them well in their new roles.

He said in an interview on RTE Radio: “These are very personal decisions – after several very busy, very intense years, they have decided to move on. We respect that and wish them the best in their new roles. .

“Obviously these positions will now be advertised and will be open to other public health physicians or other suitably qualified individuals to apply for these jobs.”

Dr Glynn, who took on the role of Deputy Chief Medical Officer in 2018, has become one of the best-known personalities on the airwaves in Ireland during the pandemic.

He also served as acting chief medical officer during the pandemic for several months while Dr. Holohan was temporarily absent.

He is a graduate of University College Dublin, University of Aberdeen and NUI Galway, as well as a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland.

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The departure of Dr Tony Holohan as chief medical officer has been overshadowed by controversy over his planned role as a professor at Trinity College Dublin (Brian Lawless/PA)


Dr Tony Holohan’s exit as chief medical officer has been overshadowed by controversy over his planned role as a professor at Trinity College Dublin (Brian Lawless/PA)

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Dr Tony Holohan’s exit as chief medical officer has been overshadowed by controversy over his planned role as a professor at Trinity College Dublin (Brian Lawless/PA)

Dr Holohan’s exit from the post of chief medical officer was overshadowed by controversy over his planned secondment to a professorship at Trinity College Dublin.

Dr Holohan decided not to take on the proposed role after a dispute over the transparency of the process that would have seen the state pay his annual salary of 187,000 euros through competitive research funding, administered by the Health Research Board.

The row has drawn criticism of Health Minister Stephen Donnelly, as well as the Secretary General of the Department of Health, Robert Watt.

Professor Philip Nolan, who chaired Ireland’s Epidemiological Modeling Advisory Group as part of the National Public Health Emergency Team (Nphet), was appointed as the new chief executive of Science Foundation Ireland last October.