North Carolina doctor returns after helping provide medical care in Ukraine

A doctor from North Carolina shares his story of helping the people of Ukraine after he recently returned from there. WXII spoke with Dr. David Callaway, chief medical officer for Team Rubicon, a veteran-led international disaster response and humanitarian relief organization. David Callaway not only works with Team Rubicon, but he’s also Chief of Crisis Operations and Professor of Emergency Medicine for Atrium Health. He told WXII 12 News that he and other Team Rubicon members were recently in western Ukraine, Poland and hungry to help. Midway through the war, Callaway, who is Team Rubicon’s chief medical officer, said that when he and others were in the field recently in western Ukraine, Poland and Hungary, their focus was to provide the best possible medical care. “We mainly provided mobile medical care in these different IDP camps and we saw largely women, children and elderly people to these very vulnerable populations who had been displaced from their homes,” he said. he declares. Callaway said it’s critical that when Team Rubicon operates in another country, they work hand-in-hand with local healthcare systems to ensure they’re caring for people in the most ethical and responsible way. effective. “My job at the beginning was first to confirm the need, then to make sure that we effectively build these relationships with the World Health Organization, the Ukrainian Ministry of Health and local hospital systems and third to me ensure that our teams would be safe in this environment,” he said. He said the medical teams are self-sufficient and can therefore treat 100 patients a day for two weeks without resupply. He said they had items like medical equipment, their own food, electricity and water. Callaway said the team was able to use Ukrainian American doctors, as well as enlist the help of local medical students who could quickly train to become medical switches. He said having an impact is what keeps him going. “It certainly affects me when I see a population made up largely of women and children. It reminds me of my children, but I will also tell you when I come back and my daughters will hug me and thank me for coming and all of a sudden they know the cities of Ukraine and Poland and there’s a reason now for them to do it I’ve known otherwise, it gives me a sense of pride, it gives me a sense of community,” he said. Callaway said teams having an impact is what keeps him going. He said when he returned recently, there were still teams on the ground.

A doctor from North Carolina shares his story of helping the people of Ukraine after he recently returned from there.

WXII spoke with Dr. David Callaway, chief medical officer for Team Rubicon, a veteran-led international disaster response and humanitarian relief organization.

Dr. David Callaway not only works with the Rubicon team, but he is also Chief of Crisis Operations and Professor of Emergency Medicine for Atrium Health. He told WXII 12 News that he and other Team Rubicon members were recently in western Ukraine, Poland and hungry to help.

Midway through the war, Callaway, who is Team Rubicon’s chief medical officer, said that when he and others were in the field recently in western Ukraine, Poland and Hungary, their focus was to provide the best possible medical care.

“We mainly provided mobile medical care in these different IDP camps and we saw largely women, children and elderly people to these very vulnerable populations who had been displaced from their homes,” he said. he declares.

Callaway said it’s critical that when Team Rubicon operates in another country, they work hand-in-hand with local healthcare systems to ensure they’re caring for people in the most ethical and responsible way. effective.

“My job at the beginning was first to confirm the need, then to make sure that we effectively build these relationships with the World Health Organization, the Ukrainian Ministry of Health and local hospital systems and third to me ensure that our teams would be safe in this environment,” he said.

He said the medical teams are self-sufficient and can therefore treat 100 patients a day for two weeks without resupply. He said they had items like medical equipment, their own food, electricity and water. Callaway said the team was able to use Ukrainian American doctors, as well as enlist the help of local medical students who could quickly train to become medical switches. He said having an impact is what keeps him going.

“It certainly affects me when I see a population made up largely of women and children. It reminds me of my children, but I will also tell you when I come back and my daughters will hug me and thank me for coming and all of a sudden they know the cities of Ukraine and Poland and there’s a reason now for them to do it I’ve known otherwise, it gives me a sense of pride, it gives me a sense of community,” he said.

Callaway said teams having an impact is what keeps him going. He said when he returned recently, there were still teams on the ground.