Military medical aid continues for San Juan Regional Medical Center

Like so many hospitals, San Juan Regional Medical Center (SJRMC) officials said it has been difficult during the coronavirus pandemic. According to the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH), Farmington Hospital is still considered the hardest hit facility when it comes to limited resources and staffing shortages. The medical center was also the first in the state to declare a “standards of care crisis” in November. “We are busy, even without COVID,” said SJRMC Chief Medical Officer Dr. Robert Underwood. Underwood added that the Farmington area is currently experiencing an increase in COVID-19 cases throughout the community, and they are already preparing to see even more patients requiring hospital care. The increase is due to the omicron variant. in the number of cases in the community, but we do not consider them hospitalizations, ”said Dr Underwood. “But we anticipate that will start to happen.” Despite more than 1,600 staff at the medical center, officials say operations aren’t getting any easier. Since January 16, the SJRMC remains in a “crisis of standards of care”. Underwood said he was also concerned about more employees calling in sick due to the ongoing virus. “Teams of 20 military medical personnel are currently assisting at the medical center. One from the Department of Defense and one from the Department of the Navy. KOAT spoke exclusively with a group when “They arrived at the hospital in December. “We are here to help whatever the hospital needs and asks of us, and if we can support them, we will do so 100%,” the chief said. Master John Barbon of the United States Navy said Dr. Underwood added that the continued support of federal teams has helped tremendously over the past two months, especially in terms of the morale of SJRMC personnel. those strengths here, and bringing them into our overall team, has been really great,” Dr. Underwood said. Hospital officials said they were unsure if more federal assistance was on the way. January, the administration of President Joe Biden announced that a team e of 20 people would arrive in New Mexico to help staff at the University of New Mexico (UNMH) hospital. Nonetheless, Dr Underwood said preparations were already underway at Farmington Medical Center in anticipation of the surge in patients. “If we fill our intensive care unit, then where does the next phase of patients who need intensive care go?” SJRMC will continue to implement certain protocols including requiring face masks and limiting visitors for patient and staff safety.

Like so many hospitals, San Juan Regional Medical Center (SJRMC) officials said it has been difficult during the coronavirus pandemic.

According to the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH), Farmington Hospital is still considered the hardest hit facility when it comes to limited resources and staffing shortages.

The medical center was also the first in the state to declare a “standards of care crisis” in November.

“We are busy, even without COVID,” said SJRMC Chief Medical Officer Dr. Robert Underwood.

Dr. Underwood added that the Farmington area is currently experiencing an increase in COVID-19 cases throughout the community, and they are already preparing to see even more patients requiring hospital care.

The thrust is due to the omicron variant.

“There are very large increases in the number of cases in the community, but we don’t consider them hospitalizations,” Dr Underwood said. “But we anticipate that will start to happen.”

Despite more than 1,600 staff at the medical center, officials say operations aren’t getting any easier.

Since January 16, the SJRMC remains in a “crisis of standards of care”.

Dr Underwood said he was also concerned about more staff calling in sick due to the ongoing virus.

“If they’re infected, they obviously don’t come to work, and we have to be prepared for whatever happens next in terms of a pandemic,” Dr Underwood said.

Teams of 20 military medical personnel are currently assisting at the medical center.

One from the Ministry of Defense and the other from the Ministry of the Navy.

KOAT spoke exclusively with one group when they arrived at the hospital in December.

“We’re here to help with whatever the hospital needs and asks of us, and if we can support it, we do it 100 percent,” said Chief Petty Officer John Barbon of the U.S. Navy.

Dr Underwood added that the continued support of federal teams has helped tremendously over the past two months.

Especially when it comes to the morale of the SJRMC staff members.

“Having those strengths here, and integrating them into our overall team, has been really great,” Dr. Underwood said.

Hospital officials said they don’t know if more federal aid is on the way.

On January 13, the administration of President Joe Biden announced that a team of 20 people would arrive in New Mexico to assist staff at the University of New Mexico (UNMH) hospital.

Nonetheless, Dr Underwood said preparations were already underway at Farmington Medical Center in anticipation of the surge in patients.

“It’s staffing levels. It has to do with bed capacity,” Dr Underwood said. “If we fill our intensive care unit, where does the next phase of patients who need intensive care go?”

SJRMC will continue to implement certain protocols including requiring face masks and limiting visitors for patient and staff safety.